Cradle Cap

cradle-cap

What is cradle cap

If your baby’s scalp has flaky, dry skin that looks like dandruff, or thick, oily, yellowish / brown crusty patches, it’s probably cradle cap. Cradle cap is a skin condition that is very common. It might not be beautiful, but it is harmless and it’s not itchy and won’t cause your baby any discomfort and it isn’t contagious.

What causes cradle cap?

Cradle cap is not caused by poor hygiene or an allergy. It’s thought that it happens as a result of hormones left in your baby’s body from pregnancy. These stimulate secretions from the oil glands in the skin, making the dead skin cells, which normally fall off without us noticing, stick to the scalp. The secretions tend to reduce in the weeks and months after birth, which is why the condition usually clears up on its own a few weeks or months after birth.

Other thoughts are that it is caused by a reaction to a yeast called malassezia which occurs naturally on the skin.

Your baby may be inclined to have cradle cap if there is a family history of allergic conditions, such as eczema.

When does it occur?

Cradle cap most commonly occurs in the first few months and usually clears up of its own in about six to 12 months – although some children have it for longer. Older children up to toddler age can get it, too.

Cradle cap can also appear on baby’s face, ears and neck, and around the nappy area, armpits and behind the knees, although this is rare. It’s the same condition, but here it’s called seborrhoeic eczema (dermatitis) rather than cradle cap.

How can I treat my baby’s cradle cap?

For mild cradle cap, time is often the best treatment, as many children get better on their own by the time they are about a year old.

We left cradle cap to clear naturally in our little ones, and it eventually did just that.

The scales start to become flaky and come off easily, often with a few strands of hair attached, but the hair soon grows back.

However, if you want to try and treat it, never be tempted to scratch or pick at the crust because this could lead to infection.

While your baby has cradle cap, there are some ways to gently remove the scales:

  • Gently massage a mild baby oil into your baby’s scalp. If you want to, you can leave the oil on overnight, and then carefully and gently brush off the softened flakes in the morning with a soft baby brush or towel. Clean the remaining oil off by shampooing with a mild baby shampoo.
  • Stronger shampoos are available in pharmacies, but you probably won’t need them. If you do decide to use a stronger shampoo, make sure you read the instructions first and keep it out of your baby’s eyes.

Should I take my baby to the doctor if he has cradle cap?

There is usually no need to see your GP if your baby has cradle cap. However, you may want to ask them for advice if your baby’s cradle cap starts to look red and swollen as this could mean it is infected, or if the cradle cap spreads to your little one’s face or body. Your doctor can prescribe an antifungal cream or shampoo.

little-green-radicals-scalp-oil  martina-gebhardt-calendula-body-oil

weleda-calendula-shampoo-body-wash weleda-calendula-body-oil

 

www.nhs.uk/conditions/cradle-cap

Cheesy Spatzle Pasta

 

INGREDIENTS
4 servings

  • 18 oz (500g) Spatzle
  • 8 oz (225g) Emmental cheese, grated
  • 2 onions, thinly sliced
  • 57g butter
  • optional: 2-3 slices of fried lean smoked bacon, cut into small pieces; roasted or steamed pumpkin cubes

METHOD

  • Preheat the oven to 350°F/175°C.
  • Cook the Spatzle in a large pan with boiling salted water until al dente. Drain.
  • Meanwhile melt the butter in a pan and fry the onions until golden.
  • Mix the Spatzle with grated cheese and place in a baking dish. Season with salt and pepper. Add some fried bacon or roasted pumpkin cubes, for extra tasty goodness.
  • Sprinkle over the onions and bake in the oven for 15-20 minutes until slightly brown.

Delicious served with salad leaves and cherry tomatoes or a beetroot salad.

Alb Gold Organic Spelt Spatzle

Tomato and Mozzarella Deep Pan Pizza

Free from Gluten, Peanuts, Egg, Soya, Wheat, Dairy
Vegetarian, Vegan, Without crystal sugar

INGREDIENTS

Deep pan pizza base
• 350g FREEE Pizza Base Mix
• 350ml tepid water
• 3 tbsp  oil

Topping
• 250g  tomato sauce
• 200g  mozzarella, grated

METHOD

Deep Pan Pizza Base
1. Line a 28x30cm baking tray with parchment and pre-heat the oven.
2. Put the pizza base mix, tepid water and oil into a large bowl and stir to a thick paste.
3. Tip the paste onto the prepared tray and spread it to the edges with a spatula.
4. Leave in a warm place for 30 minutes.
5. Using a fork, prick all over the pizza base.
6. Pre-bake for 25 minutes.

Topping
1. Remove the pizza base from the oven and cover it with tomato sauce.
2. Scatter grated mozzarella over the top
3. Bake for a further 12 minutes.
Temperature: 220°C, Fan 200°C, 425°F, Gas 7
Cooking time: 25 minutes + 12 minutes

www.dovesfarm.co.uk/recipes/tomato-and-mozzarella-deep-pan-pizza

Freee by Doves Farm Gluten Free Pizza Base Mix

Alb-Gold Organic Vegetable Ragout Pasta Sauce

Alb Gold Organic Italian Tomato Sauce

Alb Gold Organic Tomato, Ricotta & Rocket Sauce

Alb Gold Organic Tomato, Ricotta & Rocket Sauce

Crafted wooden toys, made with Love

When we are looking for new products to bring to Ulula, we use our heads and our hearts equally, in the belief that if both are in agreement, we feel that we have found the right product!

When we started looking to expand our range of toys, our hours of buying and trying led us to Hohenfried.

In this modern world, Hohenfried Heimat feels to us a real gem in our midst. Hohenfried is an open community of learning for disabled adults and children, providing sheltered accommodation, schools, and employment in organic agriculture, craft workshops, carpentry, gourmet kitchens, and bakeries. Hohenfried is not simply a ‘place’. It is a home; a field of learning, a gathering of people, wildlife and most importantly of all, purpose.

Sitting in the Bavarian Alps, the landscape alternates between woodlands and meadows with flowing transitions between nature and the areas of living and working.

For Ulula, the wooden rattles that came to our attention made us fall in love! The rattles are made in the community workshops, and are made entirely of local timber, cut mostly (and sustainably) from trees grown in the communities own grounds; the toys are beautifully machined, and finished only using pure vegetable oils.

The various rattles or greifling (clutching) toys are handmade to the renowned carpenter, pedagogue, and educational theorist Hugo Kükelhaus’s original 1930s ‘allbedeut’ designs. Kükelhaus was a well-known German architect, educator and environmentalist, who designed a range of special baby toys which promote sensory, motor skills and the imagination.

Hohenfried Dreilochring Rattle
This beautiful, chunky, handmade wooden rattle, containing two balls of beechwood securely enclosed within an outer ring of strong cherry wood, makes a lovely, gentle sound when shaken. The silky, smooth surface is finished with a natural oil so you can rest assured it is safe for little mouths, and the size is perfect for little hands to grab, hold, explore and shake. A quality rattle, made with love, that is certain to become an heirloom. Comes packaged in an unbleached cotton drawstring bag.

Hohenfried Kugel Rattle

This handmade wooden ball rattle is made of pear tree wood with an inner ball of hard cherry wood. The ridged, textured surface is finished with a natural oil so you can rest assured it is safe for little mouths, and the size is perfect for little hands to grab, hold, explore and shake. Comes packaged in an unbleached cotton drawstring bag.

“My mum had a rattle just like this, and as soon as she saw it at Ulula she had to get it for my little one – it already feels like an heirloom because of the familiarity, and my LO loves it so much x” Johanna

Hohenfried Urfisch Rattle
This fun, eternally classic, quality handmade wooden rattle contains a wooden inner ball which makes a pleasing sound when shaken. The multi-textured surface is finished with a natural oil so you can rest assured it is safe for little mouths, and the size is perfect for little hands to grab, hold, explore and shake. A delightful rattle, beautifully made with love, that is certain to become an heirloom. Comes packaged in an unbleached cotton drawstring bag.

 

Hohenfried Greifling Rattle
This lovingly handmade wooden ring rattle contains a central bar holding three loose disks which make a lovely sound when shaken. The silky, smooth surface is finished with a natural oil so you can rest assured it is safe for little mouths, and the size is perfect for little hands to grab, hold, explore and shake. Comes packaged in an unbleached cotton drawstring bag.

“Love this so much – it is so beautiful to hold, and just brilliant for my son – he is teething, and he loves a good gnaw!!” Anna

 

Enjoying our Great Outdoors this Summer!

The weather is warming up, the days are longer and there’s more time to be outside doing fun things! But if you and your little one are going to be out in the sun you need to stay sun safe.

Tips to keep you child safe in the sun

  1. Encourage playing in the shade – for example, under trees – especially between 10am and 4pm, when the sun is at its strongest.
  2. Keep babies under the age of six months out of direct sunlight, especially around midday.
  3. Cover exposed parts of your little one’s skin with sunscreen, even on cloudy or overcast days. Use one that has a sun protection factor (SPF) of 30 or above and is effective against UVA and UVB. Don’t forget to apply it to their shoulders, nose, ears, cheeks, the tops of feet and the backs of knees when they’re playing, as these are the most common areas for sunburn. Reapply often throughout the day – least every 2 hours.
  4. Cover up your child in loose cotton clothes – such as an oversized T-shirt with sleeves – that you can’t see your hand through. You may still get burned through more sheer fabrics.
  5. Make sure your child wears a hat, ideally a floppy hat with a wide brim that shades their face and neck. A baseball cap leaves unprotected ears and the back of the neck exposed to the dangers of burning.
  6. Reapply sunscreen more often if children have been swimming or sweating a lot — even if the sunscreen is waterproof. And remember that you can get sunburned more quickly when you’re paddling, swimming or boating because the reflection from the water intensifies the sun’s rays. Reapply after towelling.

 

The article below is taken from parents.com and we thought it interesting.

Sun Care 101: The Basics of Sun Safety for Kids

Just one blistering sunburn in childhood can double your little one’s lifetime risk of melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. Young, sensitive skin is especially vulnerable to damaging rays, so protect your child by being sun-care savvy.

What’s the difference between UVA and UVB?

Ultraviolet A (UVA) rays make the skin tan; ultraviolet B (UVB) rays cause skin to burn. But don’t be fooled: A tan isn’t healthier. “Both suntans and sunburns are signs that skin cells have been damaged by radiation from the sun,” says Kavita Mariwalla, M.D., director of Mohs and Dermatologic Surgery at Continuum Health Partners in New York City. UVB used to get all of the blame for causing skin cancer, but new research shows UVA is equally damaging. This is particularly worrisome since UVA rays are 30 to 50 times more prevalent, and they penetrate deeper into skin cells.

What does SPF stand for? Is a higher number more effective?

An SPF, or sun protection factor, indicates a sunscreen’s effectiveness at preventing sunburn. “If your child’s skin reddens in 10 minutes without sunscreen, SPF 15 multiplies that time (10 minutes) by 15, meaning she’d be protected from sunburn for approximately 150 minutes or 2 1/2 hours. Of course, this depends on an adequate application of sunscreen and is based on SPF calculations with artificial instead of natural sunlight. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends using sunscreens with at least an SPF of 15*, which blocks 93 percent of UVB rays. Higher SPFs provide even greater protection, but only to a certain point: SPF 30 blocks 97 percent of UVB and SPF 50+ (the maximum SPF you’ll find) blocks 98 percent.

What should I look for in a sunscreen? Are sunscreen sticks and sprays as effective as lotions?

As long as you’re using a sunscreen with SPF 15* or higher that’s broad-spectrum (meaning it blocks both UVA and UVB rays), it doesn’t matter whether you use a lotion, cream, gel, stick, or spray. Some young children are sensitive to certain sunscreen ingredients. To test for reactions, apply a small dab on the inside of your child’s upper arm and check the area in 24 hours for signs of redness or rash. Sunscreens with titanium dioxide or zinc oxide are often less irritating because the ingredients aren’t absorbed into skin.

At what age is it safe to put sunscreen on a baby?

Your baby’s skin is sensitive and can easily absorb too many chemicals, so only use sun creams with zinc oxide as the active ingredient, and use on small areas of baby’s body. Use clothing plus shade as the primary method of protection. Provide additional protection by keeping her out of the sun as much as possible: take walks before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., when UVB rays aren’t as intense; use a stroller canopy; dress her in lightweight clothing that covers her arms and legs; and choose a wide-brimmed hat or bonnet that covers her face, ears, and neck.

How much sunscreen should I use on my child? How often should I reapply it?

The Skin Cancer Foundation (skincancer.org) recommends that adults use at least an ounce (that’s a shot glass) of sunscreen, but there’s no set amount for growing children. The important thing is to cover all exposed areas (especially easily overlooked places like ears, tops of feet, backs of knees, and hands) 30 minutes before your child heads outside so her skin has time to absorb it. Reapply at least every two hours, more frequently if she’s swimming, playing in water, or sweating.


*SPF gives an indication of how much longer it will take for your skin to burn with sun cream compared with bare skin over the whole day. However, studies suggest that most people won’t achieve the specified SPF due to poor application. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends 35ml for the total body – that’s around seven teaspoons: one for the face/head and neck, one for each arm and each leg, and one each for your front and your back. The average amount of sunscreen we typically apply is about half of what we ideally need to. Not applying enough sun cream reduces the level of protection we’re receiving. According to the WHO, applying a smaller quantity of sun cream leads to a disproportionate reduction in protection – if the quantity applied is reduced by half, protection may fall by as much as two thirds. Therefore, using an SPF 30 or higher is a safer option. (which.co.uk/reviews/sun-creams/article/spf-uva-uvb-sun-creams-explained)


Does my child really need to wear sunscreen in the winter or on overcast days?

Up to 80 percent of UV rays penetrate clouds and reflect off sand, water, snow, and even concrete. “Kids actually may be more exposed to UV rays on cool days because they stay outside longer,” Dr. Mariwalla says. Basic sun protection tips — clothing that covers arms and legs, wide-brimmed hat, sunglasses, and sunscreen — still apply.

Will my child get enough vitamin D if she’s always wearing sunscreen?

Your child needs vitamin D to help his body absorb calcium and build strong bones, and sunshine is a great source. Studies suggest that some infants and children don’t get enough vitamin D (perhaps due to increased sunscreen use).

My family has dark skin. Do we need to worry about sun protection?

“It’s a fallacy that people with dark skin are immune to skin cancer,” Dr. Mariwalla says. Although skin cancer affects between 1 and 4 percent of African Americans, Latinos, and Asians, it’s often deadlier because it goes undetected longer (and rates among Asians are rising). In dark skin, cancer can also lurk in areas that aren’t exposed to the sun, like the palms of hands, soles of feet, and mucous membranes.

Besides sunscreen, what else can I do to protect my family?

Keep your child out of the sun between 10am and 4pm, when UVB rays are most intense. Dress him in clothing that have a UV protection of at least SPF 30 or that have a tight weave (you shouldn’t be able to see easily through it) and make sure he wears a wide-brimmed hat that protect his face, ears, and neck. Seek shade as much as possible.

www.parents.com/kids/safety/outdoor/sun-care-basics/

If you are planning on using a paddling pool this summer, avoid plastic toys with holes, as they can turn into a bacteria bomb:

https://blog.ulula.co.uk/2016/07/18/dont-drop-a-bacteria-bomb-in-your-childs-bathtub/

Bathtime Fun

Bathing is soothing to most babies as the water reminds them of being in their mother’s womb. However, when babies are tiny, you don’t need to bathe them and certainly not every day. Their skin is still forming and adjusting to being on the outside and so needs only simple, gentle care. To start with you can just wash baby’s face, neck, hands and bottom. This is often called ‘topping and tailing’.

From about four months, baby’s skin has developed a functioning protective mantle and it is around this age that bathtime can really become fun. Choose a time when your baby is awake and happy and make sure that the room is warm and there are no draughts. You must never leave your baby or toddler alone in the bath, so gather all the things you will need beforehand and put them within reach.

You can use your elbow to check the water temperature if you don’t have a special bath thermometer – it should be about 37°C, which is about the same as body temperature and best suited for baby. A careful dipping of their feet or the bottom first helps them to get used to the water. For tiny babies, put your left arm under baby’s neck and gently hold around their shoulder and arm with your left hand – the back of baby’s head should feel supported and secure on your forearm. With your free hand you can then wash baby. For larger children, the bathing water should not reach higher than their waist and babies can feel more comfortable when they can touch the end of the bathtub with their feet.

It is important that baby doesn’t get too cold. Five to eight minutes is normally long enough in the bath as you don’t want the water to cool down too much and since the head loses a lot of heat, only wet their hair towards the end.  After the bath wrap your little one up in a warm towel and gently dry. Now is the perfect time for a lovely cuddle followed perhaps by a massage with a soothing baby oil.

Weleda Calendula Baby Oil

Martina Gebhardt Calendula Body Oil

Baby’s Delicate Skin

After birth, your baby loses the protective warmth of the mother’s body and now the skin is the only border between inside and outside and the environment. Baby skin is five times thinner than adult skin and is still developing. The top layer is formed through interaction with the environment, while the protective acid mantle and barrier function are also still forming. This means that baby’s skin absorbs externally applied active ingredients faster and can be much more sensitive. The sweat glands are also not yet fully developed, so baby’s small body has trouble regulating its warmth independently.

After birth, babies therefore need a warm, protective coat, not only in the form of natural, breathable materials, but also through skin-compatible care products and loving skin contact.

During the first months of life baby’s skin needs simple, gentle care, for example your baby doesn’t need foam baths or shampoos as they only dry out the skin. A bath once a week is perfectly adequate in the first months of life and in the meantime your baby can be cleaned daily with a soft, damp washcloth. After washing or bathing, a body lotion can be applied to protect the skin of your baby and provide moisture. The most sensitive part is the nappy area, which needs extra special care. After a nappy change, it is good for the skin to be cleaned and treated with warm water, a soft cloth and then a few drops of body oil. Alternatively, you can put a few drops of oil in the water. If possible allow your baby to lie in a warm place for a few minutes, without a nappy on to allow the skin to have some fresh air. Finally, a layer of a good nappy cream offers protection against soreness.

Weleda Calendula Baby Care provides comfort and supports the development of healthy skin. From over eighty years of experience working with natural substances comes Weleda’s deep understanding of the special needs of a baby’s delicate skin. All of their products have been developed with the assistance of physicians and midwives and are dermatologically tested.

Martina Gebhardt’s Baby Care Range is demeter certified, ensuring the finest quality ingredients. The creams contain wool wax or lanolin as a base. The special value of the wool wax is that it closely resembles the vernix, the white, cheesy cell layer that covers and protects the baby‘s skin while in the womb. Wool wax gently protects sensitive baby skin and is very effective against nappy rash, which is why it is an important ingredient in the Martina Gebhardt Calendula Super- Protect cream.

Tip: Make your own wipes for traveling: for the purest option combine cooled boiled water with a few drops of organic baby oil. Place organic cotton wool pads in a shallow leak-proof container and pour the water and oil mixture over the pads until they are fully moistened. Keep the lid on to maintain the moisture and you are ready to go. As the liquid contains no preservatives or chemicals, make enough for just a couple of days at a time. You can also add some baby soap, but we didn’t find this necessary. Essential oils can cause irritation to very sensitive skin.