Tag Archives: celebrations

MOGLi Creepy Halloween Snacks

MOGLi Pretzel Pumpkins

mogli-chocolate-halloween-ideas

INGREDIENTS

  • 1 packet of MOGLi Spelt Pretzels
  • 1 pack of chocolate beans (especially green)
  • 1 bar of white chocolate
  • 5 drops of orange food colouring

METHOD

  1. Break the chocolate into small pieces and melt in a bowl over a water bath. When the chocolate is runny, carefully stir in the food colouring.
  2. Dip the pretzels one at a time in the bowl with a fork. When fully coated place on baking paper or a plate.
  3. Make the green leaves with your selected chocolate beans (carefully chopped in half) or you could use green icing. Leave to cool and the perfect Halloween pumpkins are ready to enjoy!

 

MOGLi Pizza Stick Witches Brooms

mogli-pizza-stick-witches-broom

INGREDIENTS

METHOD

  1. Take a cheese slice and cut off a piece about 5cm wide.
  2. Wrap the cheese slice tightly around one end of a pizza stick.
  3. Wrap a couple of chives tightly around the cheese and secure. Your broom stick is now ready to fly!

Bees make more than honey; what we can do to protect bees & other pollinators…

biodynamic-bees

Bees make more than honey – they are key to food production because they pollinate crops. Honeybees, bumblebees, wild bees and insects like butterflies, wasps, and hoverflies are responsible for pollinating at least 35% of the crops we eat, including our favourite fruit and vegetables like apples, pears, onions and carrots, as well as enabling up to 90% of wild plants to thrive. 80% of European wildflowers require insect pollination. Many of them such as foxglove, clovers and vetches rely on bees.

But currently, more and more bees are dying.  There is a 2% decline in insects every year. A world without pollinators would be devastating for food production. Why is this decline happening and how can we help bees and other pollinators to recover?

The trigger for the decline in bees is man

Loss of habitat, urbanisation, intensification of agriculture, insecticides and herbicides, monocultures, parasites, pathogens and climate change all play a part in declining bee and insect pollinator numbers.

Urbanisation means fewer green spaces with bee-friendly plants, which when combined with the intensification of agriculture has led to a loss and fragmentation of valuable habitats for pollinators, such as grasslands, old fields, shrublands, forests, and hedgerows. This is thought to be the major cause of decline in wild pollinator numbers.

Since the 1940’s industrial monocultures have replaced polycultures full of biodiversity. Monoculture farming means that only single varieties of plants are cultivated over large areas, which then all bloom at the same time. This is great for the bees during those flowering times, but during the other months of the year they can struggle to find food.

wild-beeNot all bees are the same. There are over 20,000 known species of bee globally. Around 270 species of bee have been recorded in the UK. Only 1 of these is the famous Honeybee. Wild bees, in contrast to the honeybee and the bumblebee which live in social colonies, are loners and build their nests in tree trunks, snail shells, crevices and holes in the ground. They undertake all work from nest building to brood care themselves. About 30% of the wild bee species find their food only on certain plant species and are in symbiosis with them. This means that plants and wild bees benefit from each other. If these plants are no longer sufficiently available because other plants are more profitable, the bees are unable to feed on their ideal food source and if they then die the plant cannot survive either. As a result, not only the bee dies, but also the plant biodiversity decreases.  Therefore, it is very important that we protect the diversity of plants and thus also the wild bees.

Biodynamic farming uses open-pollinated seed.  This is seed that is renewable, it can be saved by farmers and growers for the next year and used to naturally breed new varieties which helps to ensure diversity

Pesticides are harming bees and other insects, after all that is what they’re designed to do. There has been a rise in pesticide use over recent times, with farming becoming heavily dependent on pesticides. The average field is treated with pesticides 17.4 times a year in the UK.

In Biodynamic agriculture soil preparations containing oak bark are applied to the soil. The tannins contained in it help to repel insects

Parasites like the Varroa mite have been identified as a major cause of bee colony loss. Agro-chemical companies claim that industrial chemical pesticides, including neonicotinoids, play an almost negligible role in bee death. However, studies show that pesticides undermine the immune system of insects, making them more susceptible to disease, parasites and pathogens which in turn significantly weakened honeybees, causing high mortality and high levels of stress. In addition, the use of pesticides contaminates the soil.

In order to fight the mite, only organic acids are used in biodynamic beekeeping

What we can do to protect bees & other pollinators

Bees are a fantastic symbol of nature. That they are in trouble is a sign that our natural environment is not in the good shape it should be. Whilst over 60% of crops such as wheat, millet, rice, potatoes and bananas are wind pollinated or self pollinated, a world without vegetables and fruit would result in diets that would be dull, poorer and less nutritious. Ecological, organic and demeter farming offers a solution for the global pollinators and agriculture crisis. Ecological farming ensures healthy farming and healthy food for today and tomorrow by protecting soil, water and climate and by promoting biodiversity. It does not contaminate the environment with chemical inputs like synthetic chemical pesticides, fertilisers nor genetically engineered organisms. Ecological farming is feasible and already practiced on a large geographic scale within Europe.

MOGLi and Holle advocate organic and organic-plus demeter farming, helping to ensure healthy habitats and food for bees and pollinators, and healthy food for babies, children and adults too.

What we can do as gardeners to help bees

There are things that we can do at home to make our gardens as bee-friendly as possible:

  1. Put away harmful chemical insecticides.
  2. Leave a small area of your garden to go wild or undisturbed in the summer months, so bumblebees can create their nests and other insects are given shelter.
  3. Provide habitat such as a small wood pile in a corner where bugs can nest and feed. Build (or buy) a simple home for solitary bees.
  4. Grow a wide range of plants that flower throughout the year to ensure there are no hunger-gaps. Ivy flowers during the autumn months, a crucial time for bees as they build up their stores for the winter. Spring bulbs will provide an early source of food as will hazel and pussy or goat willow.
  5. Choose bee-friendly plants. Honeybees prefer open, daisy-like flowers such as cosmos, sunflowers and michaelmas daisies, asters etc. Verbena bonariensis is also a favourite. Bees also love herbs such as marjoram, mint, chives, fennel, lavender and thyme and will help pollinate your veg and fruit.

 

mogli.de/ursachen-fuer-das-bienensterben/

sos-bees.org/

friendsoftheearth.uk/bees/why-do-we-need-bees

www.nhm.ac.uk/discover/news/2018/november/bee-declines-is-banning-pesticides-the-solution.html

www.biodynamic.org.uk/sustainability-corner-bee-positive/

Holle – make your own finger paints

holle-home-made-finger-paints

Making your own non-toxic, edible finger pains is simple with this quick, easy and inexpensive recipe using ingredients found in the kitchen. Give those little hands, feet and fingers free rein to enjoy being creative and having fun!

It’s so easy:

  • 5 tbsps of flour
  • 100ml of cold water
  • 1 tbsp salt (for shelf life)
  • To add colour try vegetable juices eg beetroot / carrot or spices eg turmeric (be careful, it can stain) or food colouring
  • Mix the ingredients together

Kept in the fridge, the paints should last up to 2 weeks.

Popsicle Time!

holle-fruit-popsicles

Here’s a fruity delicious popsicle recipe for you from the Holle Kitchen 💗

Ingredients

Method

Mix the almond paste and greek yoghurt and half fill the popsicle molds. Put pieces of fruit into the molds, add the fruit puree, sprinkle with the junior muesli and freeze for 2 hours.
Simple, delicious and super refreshing for the summer!

Ulula Down on the Farm

Week beginning 6th May 2019

A calf managed to stray through a gap in the fence this week, and then not remember how to get back… the moos to it’s mother resulted in the mother cow jumping over the… not quite the moon, but indeed the gate! A herd really only stay within the boundaries of a field because they choose to, and if they did feel the need to break out, they are more than capable – even our short legged Herefords. Thankfully they don’t feel the need to break out too frequently!!

The weather hasn’t been altogether kind for the long bank holiday weekend – a cold wind meant the children based themselves in the little orchard tree’s, climbing and leaping down – and lambing is all but completed. With only a handful of ewe’s still left in the barn, the rest are now in the field – perhaps wishing they were back in the barn during these cold nights of late!

Back to school has been successfully accomplished after the easter holidays, (spelt bites help ease the pain a lot!) Plus, with only two weeks until half term (thanks to the late easter we suppose), we think we can make it 😉 xx

 

Ulula Down on the Farm

First there was easter, and then May arrives in fine style!

The glorious sunshine and warmth over the Easter weekend meant that the Easter bunny clearly had to be very careful where the eggs for the hunt were placed – thankfully the shady areas of the garden ensured that most of the chocolate hadn’t melted before it was found!!

As for lambing, the ewes had been finding it all a bit warm, but the lambs have enjoyed their first encounter with the outside world – warmth and sunshine were such lovely weather to arrive to!

 

We knew that the lovely weather was only for a few days, but how wonderful it was, and with school starting again before we knew it, the Ulula team split up so that we could take the children away for a few days while the rest of the team stayed home to pack your parcels 🙂

We found ourselves at Stonehenge – what a wonderful place to visit – and the photo doesn’t share the wind burn we all suffered!!

As well as a trip on the bus, the wonderful views, and seeing Stonehenge for themselves, there was also a great place where the children could interact – including the opportunity to try and pull one of the Sarsen Stones!

Then to the beach… and Storm Hannah, before the sun finally reached us x

Ulula Down on the Farm

Week beginning 4th March 2019

What a very exciting weekend!!! Not only did Storm Freya try very hard, unsuccessfully thankfully, to blow us all to Kansas City, but Ulula enjoyed a wonderful birthday sandwich weekend too! The youngest of the Farm’s sheepdogs turned 4 on Saturday, we celebrated on Sunday for Ulula’s birthday, and then on Monday it is eldest brother who has a birthday… It used to be a quiet birthday month for us, but not anymore!!

If I am being completely honest, we were quite glad of the storm winds on Sunday afternoon, as a walk against them helped us recover from the large amounts of birthday cake eaten 😉 What made us a little less jolly was seeing all the early blossom, which last week felt it was safe to bloom, being blown about like confetti – a reminder if we needed one to live in the moment, and so we enjoyed the scent from the plum blossom while the children danced under the falling petals. Beautiful.

Our soil is a heavy clay, which means that if the cows were outside on the fields during the winter the grass would quickly be churned up and turned to mud. The cows are normally let out of the barn around the end of March which is always a wonderful sight. For the younger calves, it will be their first experience of grass under their hooves and blue sky directly above them.

25.2.19

The Cow – Roy Wilkinson
Heavily, wearily, moves the cow
In the peaceful country scene,
Sleepily nodding towards the ground
As she grazes the pastures green.

Her big, bulky mass of a body
Flops on the earth and she seems,
Chewing and chewing and chewing
Lost in her own world of dreams.