Tag Archives: Breastfeeding

Top Tips for Keeping Babies and Children Cool in Hot Weather

baby-sleep-coolBabies and young children should be watched carefully during hot weather. They can quickly lose body fluids through perspiring, which can lead to dehydration. They need to drink regularly, wear light clothing and be kept cool.

Babies and young children may not show early signs and symptoms of the effects of heat. They may just look unwell or be more irritable than usual. Babies may seem floppy, have drier skin, and refuse to drink, or have fewer wet nappies than usual. The soft spot on top of a baby’s head (fontanelle) may also be lower than usual.

Top tips for keeping your little one cool

When keeping your baby or young child cool during a heat wave, it’s important to remember that their bodies aren’t the same as older children or adults and react to heat differently.

  • Dress your baby or young child in light, loose clothing such as a vest and nappy, or loose top.
  • Regularly bath them in lukewarm – not cool or cold – water. If your child resists having a bath, wipe them down with a sponge or muslin dipped in lukewarm water.
  • When putting your baby or child down for a nap, choose the coolest place in the house. Make sure the cot is clear of bumpers or blankets so air can circulate through. Never leave babies to sleep in a pram as they may overheat.
  • If you have a fan, direct it towards the centre of the room to keep the air circulating, not directly at your baby or child.
  • If you have an air conditioner, try to keep the room your child is sleeping in around 18C – 20C so they don’t get too cold.
  • If you do not have a fan or air conditioner, you can cover your baby’s or toddler’s body with cool damp cloths or muslins. You can also place wrung out wet towels or sheets around the cot to cool the air near them. Check on your baby regularly to make sure they are not getting too cold.

Eating and drinking

Keeping your child hydrated is one of the most important things you can do during a period of intense heat. Young children and babies in particular, are not able to tell you they are thirsty, so it is important to make sure they are getting enough to drink. If you wait until your child is thirsty it is too late, he is already dehydrated! Get your kids drinking before thirst develops and consume additional fluids even after thirst is quenched.

    • Breastfeeding mums don’t need to give very young babies extra water during a heatwave as the breast milk provides their babies with all they need, although mums should make sure they drink plenty of fluids.
    • If your child also consumes other food, you can give them small amounts of cooled boiled water between feeds.
    • Bottle-fed babies may need extra formula or small amounts of cooled boiled water if they seem thirsty.
    • Make sure your child has regular drinks throughout the day, such as water or at worst, fruit juice. Avoid giving sugary or fizzy drinks. They can actually dehydrate them further!
  • If they’re over 6 months old and get bored with water, try giving them a combination of very diluted fruit juice, frozen fruit pieces (orange quarters, watermelon) for them to suck on and homemade dilute fruit juice lollies throughout the day. For older children, plenty of fruit and salad will also help keep their fluid levels up.

How to keep cool when travelling

Ideally, it’s best to avoid taking your baby or toddler out during periods of intense heat as babies and young children can overheat very quickly, particularly in cars. Even during cooler days, cars can heat up to dangerously high temperatures very quickly. However, if you have to take your baby or child out:

  • Try to make trips during the coolest part of the day.
  • Never cover a baby seat in a car with a rug or towel to shade from the sun as this will restrict air moving around the baby, which will make them hotter.
  • Use sunshades on windows. Use a muslin, towel or stick on shade screen to cover the window next to your baby or toddler so the sun doesn’t shine directly on them through the window.
  • Never leave babies or young children alone in a car, no matter what the weather (even in mild weather cars quickly become too hot for small children).
  • Don’t leave babies to sleep in a pram in hot weather – prams can be hot and airless; make sure air can circulate around your baby.

How to keep cool at night

  • If possible choose the coolest place in the house.
  • Keep bedrooms cool throughout the day by closing blinds or curtains. Turn a room fan on before bedtime. A fan can be left on all night – but well out of reach and never pointed directly at the cot or bed.
  • Open windows in several rooms to create a through breeze.
  • Give them a tepid bath, or sponge bath, before bed and let them air dry while lying on a towel so the evaporation of the water will cool their skin down.
  • Make sure the cot is clear of bumpers or blankets so air can circulate through.
  • Hanging wrung out wet towels over chairs or windows cools the air.
  • Cover waterproof sheets with several layers of cotton sheets to absorb perspiration.
  • Remove unnecessary bedding and opt for a cool muslin sleeping bag.
  • If your baby is still hot let them sleep in a vest and nappy, or even just a nappy.
  • A nursery thermometer will help you monitor the temperature of your baby’s room. Your baby will sleep most comfortably when their room is between 16C (61F) and 20C (68F).
  • Remember that the air temperature usually cools during the night. To find out if your baby is at a comfortable temperature – not too hot, not too cold – put your hand to the back of his neck. This will give you an accurate feeling of how warm or cold the rest of their body is, because it is near the core. Arms and legs don’t give an indication of baby’s internal temperature, rather giving a reflection of the external air’s temperature.

Sick babies and children need special care in hot weather

Even with minor illnesses, such as colds or gastroenteritis, babies and small children need special care in hot weather. These illnesses often lead to a slight rise in temperature by themselves, but in hot weather this could lead to dehydration.

Frequent breastfeeding and extra drinks are important if your baby is ill. To cool a baby’s or a child’s hot body, try frequent lukewarm baths – NEVER cold – or sponge your baby or child down. Seek help if there is no improvement or if you are worried.

https://www.nhs.uk/common-health-questions/childrens-health/how-can-i-keep-my-baby-safe-during-hot-weather/

20 fascinating facts about breast milk, breastfeeding and babies

mum-and-babyMother’s breast milk is the perfect start for babies. It has all the nutrients in the right quantities and is packed full of disease-fighting antibodies. It is free, needs no preparation and is available wherever mum is and whenever baby needs a feed.

Babies will let you know when they are ready for a feed. Clues include sucking noises, hands moving towards the mouth or baby turning towards your breast. All babies are different. Some may feed for 10 – 20 minutes on each breast. However much or long they need, it is best, whenever possible, to feed when baby wants to.

Prop up your feet and support your arms and head with pillows. But the most important thing is to remain relaxed. Babies pick up on mother’s anxiety and stress.

Here are some interesting facts about breast milk, breastfeeding and babies that we found fascinating.

  • Your baby can smell you. Newborns have a strong sense of smell and know the unique scent of your breast milk. That is why your baby will turn his or her head to you when he or she is hungry.
  • Is baby feeding enough? As long as your baby appears content and satisfied after feeds, is healthy and alert when awake, is gaining weight after the first few weeks, is feeding regularly and has at least six wet nappies in every 24 hours, your little one is probably getting all the nutritious milk needed. Seek advice from your healthy visitor or doctor if you have any concerns.
  • Your baby can see you up close and personal. Babies are born extremely nearsighted, which means they can only see things about 8 to 15 inches away. That also happens to be the distance between your face and your baby’s face when breastfeeding. So when your baby locks eyes with you, it’s a true bonding moment.
  • The very best thing you can do for your milk supply is nurse your baby often. Breastmilk is very easily and quickly digested so a newborn will want to nurse at least 10-12 times in 24 hours. Usually this spaces out to about every couple of hours but it’s common for babies to nurse every hour or so in the evening.
  • Breastfeeding allows your body to recover from pregnancy and childbirth more quickly. The hormones released when you breastfeed make your uterus contract back to its pre-pregnancy size.
  • Breastfeeding exposes your baby to many different tastes. Formula has one taste.breastfeeding-eat-local But through your breast milk, your baby eventually gets a slight taste of whatever you eat, although not directly. This will later make introducing solid foods easier.
  • Breastfeeding may help you to lose weight. Mothers who exclusively breastfeed can burn as many as 600 calories a day, which may help you get back to your pre-pregnancy weight.
  • Your body starts getting ready to breastfeed during pregnancy. After you give birth, your body gets the final signal to make milk, which is usually more than one newborn can handle. Why? Your body doesn’t know whether you have one, two, three, four, or more babies to feed. Your supply then regulates to meet your baby’s (or babies’) needs.
  • Before your milk comes in, in the first few days after birth, your breasts make a thick, sticky, yellowish fluid sometimes referred to as “liquid gold.” Called colostrum, this liquid has the calcium, potassium, proteins, minerals, and antibodies your baby needs. Your baby needs only a few teaspoons to feel full and stay healthy until your milk flow increases, about two to five days after birth.
  • Your breast milk changes during a feeding session. When your baby first starts to nurse, your milk is thinner and thirst-quenching. Toward the end of the feeding session, your baby gets thicker, fat-rich milk, which gives your baby the calories needed to grow healthy and strong.
  • Breast milk heals. Breast milk is filled with special components that are designed to help fight infection and cut down on swelling in the breast. So, if your breasts are sore those first few days, gently massaging some of your milk into your nipples and breasts can soothe the soreness and speed up recovery.
  • Once a baby learns to latch on correctly it shouldn’t hurt to breastfeed. Always let your nipples dry before getting dressed again and a thin smear of white soft paraffin or purified lanolin can help with any cracks or bleeding. Also wearing cotton lined bras helps air to circulate. If soreness persists, seek advice from your midwife.
  • Babies drink until they feel full, not until the breast is emptied. On average, babies remove 67% of the milk mum has available.
  • Your body is constantly making the perfect milk for baby. Milk changes its nutritional profile as baby grows (milk made for a 3 month old is different than for a 9 month old).  Milk can even change day to day—for example, water content may increase during times of hot weather and baby-sickness to provide extra hydration.
  • Your right breast produces more milk. Almost 75% of all mums produce more milk in their right breast, whether they are right or left handed.
  • Human milk contains substances that promote sleep and calmness in babies. Breastfeeding also calms you and helps you to bond with your baby.
  • Breastfeeding doesn’t cause your breasts to sag. Pregnancy hormones can stretch the ligaments that support your breasts, so wearing a well-fitting bra while you’re pregnant is a must.
  • Breastfed babies typically get sick less. Human milk boosts a baby’s immune system helping baby fight viral, bacterial, and parasitic infections, including ear infections, diarrhoea, and stomach problems.
  • Children who are breastfed have a lower rate of certain illnesses as they grow up. Babies who are not breastfed have a higher risk of asthma, diabetes, and childhood obesity.
  • You can still breastfeed while sick. In fact, it’s good for your baby. When you get sick, your body starts fighting the illness by making antibodies, which then get passed on to your baby. By the time you show symptoms of illness, your baby has already been exposed to the virus or bacteria, which boosts your baby’s immune system. By continuing to breastfeed, you’re not just keeping your milk supply up, but you’re further protecting your baby from getting sick in the future.

 

 

Supporting Breastfeeding – Free Nursing Tea Samples for Every New Mum

Free breastfeeding tea for every mum

Free breastfeeding tea for every mum

I was really pleased that I was able to breastfeed all three of my children. Having done so I appreciate some of the difficulties mums can face when trying to breastfeed their babies. I do, though, also know the pleasures, the rewards and the sheer joy this close and intimate experience can bring to a relationship with a new baby.

After a recently published report from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology and the reaction of some of the country’s press I feel compelled to expand my new campaign to help promote breastfeeding here in the UK. Of course, my influence is limited and I desperately want to promote a natural approach that draws on the powers of traditional herbs that help with increasing breast milk supply.

Free Breastfeeding Tea for Every New Mum in the UK

So rather than just promote the Holle organic nursing tea/breastfeeding tea solely through the Ulula website I have decided that every new mum in the UK will be given the chance of receiving free samples of the tea. Since the beginning of the year every pregnant woman is being given information by the NHS on how to apply online to get their free breastfeeding tea samples as well as receiving advice on natural approaches to common breastfeeding problems. Mums can sign up to get their free nursing tea/breastfeeding tea samples at any time on our special campaign page.

Breastfeeding Problems – The Latest Research

I had mixed reactions when I saw reports of a Scandinavian publication with findings by the researchers from the Norwegian University of Science and Technology. The UK newspapers were running stories telling us how “breast milk is not better than formula”. I was horrified.

I must, of course, declare an interest here. I sell the Holle organic baby milk and formula and the baby milks are very popular with many, many mums. A huge number of mums tell me just how grateful they are to have found a baby milk of such a high quality that they can trust to give their precious baby. I recognise that a lot of mums either can’t breastfeed or don’t want to breastfeed for a great many very good reasons.

The researchers from Norway say mothers who find breastfeeding so hard that they give up should not blame themselves. They suggest that difficulties feeding a newborn may be down to higher levels of the male hormone testosterone during pregnancy. There are many reasons why a mother might have high levels of this male hormone in her womb during pregnancy as the placenta – an engine of hormone production – kicks into action.

The team suggest that the hormone may impact negatively on the development of glandular tissue in the breast, in turn affecting a mum’s ability to breastfeed her baby.

Breastfeeding – “A Mother Should Do What Makes Her Feel Happy”

Lead researcher Professor Sven Carlsen said: “Basically a mother who finds she has difficulty shouldn’t feel guilty – it probably is just the way it is, and her baby will not suffer for being fed formula milk. “A mother should do what makes her happy.”

Professor Carlsen argues that it is the hormone balance in the womb which explains both a mother’s ability to breastfeed and any apparent health benefits of a baby who is breastfed – rather than the breast milk itself.

Breastfeeding and the Alternatives

For me, it is clear that the benefits of breastfeeding, for baby and mother, are much wider than this discussion. I would, and do, advise mums to breastfeed their baby if they can possibly do so – which is why I am running this year long breastfeeding campaign.

For those mums who can’t or don’t want to breastfeed, for whatever reason, I would strongly advise feeding their precious baby with the very best quality of baby milk or baby formula alternative – look for an organic milk from cows raised in the most natural way possible and with nothing added that a growing baby’s body doesn’t need. And don’t be bullied into feeling guilty – your baby will be healthy and will thrive .

Using Nursing Tea to Naturally Increase Milk Supply

Holle organic nursing tea

Holle organic nursing tea

Many mums do want to breastfeed their baby but feel they have a low milk supply and just can’t satisfy their baby. For those mums who want to persevere and try to increase their milk supply the Holle organic nursing tea is a great way to naturally encourage lactation.

The tea is carefully formulated with a blend of the highest quality certified organic herbs traditionally used to help support healthy breast milk production. It’s a tasty and comforting tea that has already helped thousands of mums to successfully breastfeed their babies. And because it’s organic you can rest easy that there are no unnatural chemicals in your milk to harm your baby.

Let’s Spread the Message

So my message to new mums or mums-to-be is this: the Holle Organic Nursing Tea is a great contribution to making your breastfeeding experience a happy one – get your free samples today and experience the joy of watching your baby thrive as you share this special time together.

Please join our campaign to support breastfeeding and spread the word to other interested parents and professionals.

Proud to Support Breastfeeding – Holle Organic Nursing Tea

I was really pleased to have been able to have breastfed all three of my children, and having done so I have some appreciation of some of the potential difficulties new mums can face when trying to breastfeed newborns as well as older babies. I do, though, also know the pleasures, the rewards and the sheer joy this close and intimate experience can bring to a relationship with a newborn baby.

I am then proud to be selling the Holle Organic Nursing Teas to help support mums at this vital time. This herbal infusion is formulated to naturally encourage lactation in breastfeeding mums. This tasty tea is a comforting drink created to enhance the nursing experience and comes in easy to brew tea bags.

To provide more information on breastfeeding within the Ulula site I plan to write several introductory pages over the coming weeks. The first has just been uploaded and is all about the Organic Nursing Tea, it benefits and uses.

What have your experiences of breastfeeding been? If you tried the Holle Organic Nursing Tea, how did you find it? Let us know.