Category Archives: Baby Care

Enjoying our Great Outdoors this Summer!

The weather is warming up, the days are longer and there’s more time to be outside doing fun things! But if you and your little one are going to be out in the sun you need to stay sun safe.

Tips to keep you child safe in the sun

  1. Encourage playing in the shade – for example, under trees – especially between 10am and 4pm, when the sun is at its strongest.
  2. Keep babies under the age of six months out of direct sunlight, especially around midday.
  3. Cover exposed parts of your little one’s skin with sunscreen, even on cloudy or overcast days. Use one that has a sun protection factor (SPF) of 30 or above and is effective against UVA and UVB. Don’t forget to apply it to their shoulders, nose, ears, cheeks, the tops of feet and the backs of knees when they’re playing, as these are the most common areas for sunburn. Reapply often throughout the day – least every 2 hours.
  4. Cover up your child in loose cotton clothes – such as an oversized T-shirt with sleeves – that you can’t see your hand through. You may still get burned through more sheer fabrics.
  5. Make sure your child wears a hat, ideally a floppy hat with a wide brim that shades their face and neck. A baseball cap leaves unprotected ears and the back of the neck exposed to the dangers of burning.
  6. Reapply sunscreen more often if children have been swimming or sweating a lot — even if the sunscreen is waterproof. And remember that you can get sunburned more quickly when you’re paddling, swimming or boating because the reflection from the water intensifies the sun’s rays. Reapply after towelling.

 

The article below is taken from parents.com and we thought it interesting.

Sun Care 101: The Basics of Sun Safety for Kids

Just one blistering sunburn in childhood can double your little one’s lifetime risk of melanoma, the deadliest form of skin cancer. Young, sensitive skin is especially vulnerable to damaging rays, so protect your child by being sun-care savvy.

What’s the difference between UVA and UVB?

Ultraviolet A (UVA) rays make the skin tan; ultraviolet B (UVB) rays cause skin to burn. But don’t be fooled: A tan isn’t healthier. “Both suntans and sunburns are signs that skin cells have been damaged by radiation from the sun,” says Kavita Mariwalla, M.D., director of Mohs and Dermatologic Surgery at Continuum Health Partners in New York City. UVB used to get all of the blame for causing skin cancer, but new research shows UVA is equally damaging. This is particularly worrisome since UVA rays are 30 to 50 times more prevalent, and they penetrate deeper into skin cells.

What does SPF stand for? Is a higher number more effective?

An SPF, or sun protection factor, indicates a sunscreen’s effectiveness at preventing sunburn. “If your child’s skin reddens in 10 minutes without sunscreen, SPF 15 multiplies that time (10 minutes) by 15, meaning she’d be protected from sunburn for approximately 150 minutes or 2 1/2 hours. Of course, this depends on an adequate application of sunscreen and is based on SPF calculations with artificial instead of natural sunlight. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends using sunscreens with at least an SPF of 15*, which blocks 93 percent of UVB rays. Higher SPFs provide even greater protection, but only to a certain point: SPF 30 blocks 97 percent of UVB and SPF 50+ (the maximum SPF you’ll find) blocks 98 percent.

What should I look for in a sunscreen? Are sunscreen sticks and sprays as effective as lotions?

As long as you’re using a sunscreen with SPF 15* or higher that’s broad-spectrum (meaning it blocks both UVA and UVB rays), it doesn’t matter whether you use a lotion, cream, gel, stick, or spray. Some young children are sensitive to certain sunscreen ingredients. To test for reactions, apply a small dab on the inside of your child’s upper arm and check the area in 24 hours for signs of redness or rash. Sunscreens with titanium dioxide or zinc oxide are often less irritating because the ingredients aren’t absorbed into skin.

At what age is it safe to put sunscreen on a baby?

Your baby’s skin is sensitive and can easily absorb too many chemicals, so only use sun creams with zinc oxide as the active ingredient, and use on small areas of baby’s body. Use clothing plus shade as the primary method of protection. Provide additional protection by keeping her out of the sun as much as possible: take walks before 10 a.m. or after 4 p.m., when UVB rays aren’t as intense; use a stroller canopy; dress her in lightweight clothing that covers her arms and legs; and choose a wide-brimmed hat or bonnet that covers her face, ears, and neck.

How much sunscreen should I use on my child? How often should I reapply it?

The Skin Cancer Foundation (skincancer.org) recommends that adults use at least an ounce (that’s a shot glass) of sunscreen, but there’s no set amount for growing children. The important thing is to cover all exposed areas (especially easily overlooked places like ears, tops of feet, backs of knees, and hands) 30 minutes before your child heads outside so her skin has time to absorb it. Reapply at least every two hours, more frequently if she’s swimming, playing in water, or sweating.


*SPF gives an indication of how much longer it will take for your skin to burn with sun cream compared with bare skin over the whole day. However, studies suggest that most people won’t achieve the specified SPF due to poor application. The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends 35ml for the total body – that’s around seven teaspoons: one for the face/head and neck, one for each arm and each leg, and one each for your front and your back. The average amount of sunscreen we typically apply is about half of what we ideally need to. Not applying enough sun cream reduces the level of protection we’re receiving. According to the WHO, applying a smaller quantity of sun cream leads to a disproportionate reduction in protection – if the quantity applied is reduced by half, protection may fall by as much as two thirds. Therefore, using an SPF 30 or higher is a safer option. (which.co.uk/reviews/sun-creams/article/spf-uva-uvb-sun-creams-explained)


Does my child really need to wear sunscreen in the winter or on overcast days?

Up to 80 percent of UV rays penetrate clouds and reflect off sand, water, snow, and even concrete. “Kids actually may be more exposed to UV rays on cool days because they stay outside longer,” Dr. Mariwalla says. Basic sun protection tips — clothing that covers arms and legs, wide-brimmed hat, sunglasses, and sunscreen — still apply.

Will my child get enough vitamin D if she’s always wearing sunscreen?

Your child needs vitamin D to help his body absorb calcium and build strong bones, and sunshine is a great source. Studies suggest that some infants and children don’t get enough vitamin D (perhaps due to increased sunscreen use).

My family has dark skin. Do we need to worry about sun protection?

“It’s a fallacy that people with dark skin are immune to skin cancer,” Dr. Mariwalla says. Although skin cancer affects between 1 and 4 percent of African Americans, Latinos, and Asians, it’s often deadlier because it goes undetected longer (and rates among Asians are rising). In dark skin, cancer can also lurk in areas that aren’t exposed to the sun, like the palms of hands, soles of feet, and mucous membranes.

Besides sunscreen, what else can I do to protect my family?

Keep your child out of the sun between 10am and 4pm, when UVB rays are most intense. Dress him in clothing that have a UV protection of at least SPF 30 or that have a tight weave (you shouldn’t be able to see easily through it) and make sure he wears a wide-brimmed hat that protect his face, ears, and neck. Seek shade as much as possible.

www.parents.com/kids/safety/outdoor/sun-care-basics/

If you are planning on using a paddling pool this summer, avoid plastic toys with holes, as they can turn into a bacteria bomb:

https://blog.ulula.co.uk/2016/07/18/dont-drop-a-bacteria-bomb-in-your-childs-bathtub/

Bathtime Fun

Bathing is soothing to most babies as the water reminds them of being in their mother’s womb. However, when babies are tiny, you don’t need to bathe them and certainly not every day. Their skin is still forming and adjusting to being on the outside and so needs only simple, gentle care. To start with you can just wash baby’s face, neck, hands and bottom. This is often called ‘topping and tailing’.

From about four months, baby’s skin has developed a functioning protective mantle and it is around this age that bathtime can really become fun. Choose a time when your baby is awake and happy and make sure that the room is warm and there are no draughts. You must never leave your baby or toddler alone in the bath, so gather all the things you will need beforehand and put them within reach.

You can use your elbow to check the water temperature if you don’t have a special bath thermometer – it should be about 37°C, which is about the same as body temperature and best suited for baby. A careful dipping of their feet or the bottom first helps them to get used to the water. For tiny babies, put your left arm under baby’s neck and gently hold around their shoulder and arm with your left hand – the back of baby’s head should feel supported and secure on your forearm. With your free hand you can then wash baby. For larger children, the bathing water should not reach higher than their waist and babies can feel more comfortable when they can touch the end of the bathtub with their feet.

It is important that baby doesn’t get too cold. Five to eight minutes is normally long enough in the bath as you don’t want the water to cool down too much and since the head loses a lot of heat, only wet their hair towards the end.  After the bath wrap your little one up in a warm towel and gently dry. Now is the perfect time for a lovely cuddle followed perhaps by a massage with a soothing baby oil.

Weleda Calendula Baby Oil

Martina Gebhardt Calendula Body Oil

Baby’s Delicate Skin

After birth, your baby loses the protective warmth of the mother’s body and now the skin is the only border between inside and outside and the environment. Baby skin is five times thinner than adult skin and is still developing. The top layer is formed through interaction with the environment, while the protective acid mantle and barrier function are also still forming. This means that baby’s skin absorbs externally applied active ingredients faster and can be much more sensitive. The sweat glands are also not yet fully developed, so baby’s small body has trouble regulating its warmth independently.

After birth, babies therefore need a warm, protective coat, not only in the form of natural, breathable materials, but also through skin-compatible care products and loving skin contact.

During the first months of life baby’s skin needs simple, gentle care, for example your baby doesn’t need foam baths or shampoos as they only dry out the skin. A bath once a week is perfectly adequate in the first months of life and in the meantime your baby can be cleaned daily with a soft, damp washcloth. After washing or bathing, a body lotion can be applied to protect the skin of your baby and provide moisture. The most sensitive part is the nappy area, which needs extra special care. After a nappy change, it is good for the skin to be cleaned and treated with warm water, a soft cloth and then a few drops of body oil. Alternatively, you can put a few drops of oil in the water. If possible allow your baby to lie in a warm place for a few minutes, without a nappy on to allow the skin to have some fresh air. Finally, a layer of a good nappy cream offers protection against soreness.

Weleda Calendula Baby Care provides comfort and supports the development of healthy skin. From over eighty years of experience working with natural substances comes Weleda’s deep understanding of the special needs of a baby’s delicate skin. All of their products have been developed with the assistance of physicians and midwives and are dermatologically tested.

Martina Gebhardt’s Baby Care Range is demeter certified, ensuring the finest quality ingredients. The creams contain wool wax or lanolin as a base. The special value of the wool wax is that it closely resembles the vernix, the white, cheesy cell layer that covers and protects the baby‘s skin while in the womb. Wool wax gently protects sensitive baby skin and is very effective against nappy rash, which is why it is an important ingredient in the Martina Gebhardt Calendula Super- Protect cream.

Tip: Make your own wipes for traveling: for the purest option combine cooled boiled water with a few drops of organic baby oil. Place organic cotton wool pads in a shallow leak-proof container and pour the water and oil mixture over the pads until they are fully moistened. Keep the lid on to maintain the moisture and you are ready to go. As the liquid contains no preservatives or chemicals, make enough for just a couple of days at a time. You can also add some baby soap, but we didn’t find this necessary. Essential oils can cause irritation to very sensitive skin.

Is it Mothering Sunday soon? Well then, Happy Mummies Day lovely Ulula mummies x

Happy Mothering Sunday to all Fabulous Mummies, with love, from Ulula x

Treat yourself to any Martina Gebhardt Trial Kit with £10 off & free p&p

Just use code MGU178 at checkout

Martina Gebhardt’s skin care is built on the philosophy that less is more and that truly healthy skin requires a truly holistic approach. The range contains ingredients that promote healthy skin and which complement each other harmoniously. The result is a highly effective range of skin care products that nurture your skin’s functions naturally for a healthy, effortlessly radiant, glowing complexion.

All Martina Gebhardt’s products are Demeter certified biodynamic and carry the cruelty-free seal, guaranteeing the highest possible quality and absolutely no animal testing.

 Rose – balances dry, sensitive skin

Discover the beauty of the heaven-scented Rose Skin Care System by Martina Gebhardt with the Rose Mini Kit. Created for dry and sensitive skin, regular use helps to prevent premature wrinkling and support regeneration, leaving skin looking and feeling soft, smooth and radiant.

 

Sheabutter – mild & soothing

The Martina Gebhardt Sheabutter Skin Care range offers soothing, moisturising care for hypersensitive, allergy-prone skin. Totally free of any substances that may irritate allergy-prone skin, such as essential oils, alcohol, herbal extracts and bee products, and of course, any synthetic ingredients.

Ginseng – enlivens demanding, tired skin

The Martina Gebhardt Ginseng Skin Care range is packed with vitamins and activating, vitalising plant extracts to strengthen the immune system and support regeneration. Ideal for 30+ skin, it enhances the skin’s regenerative capacity, improves elasticity and maintains optimal moisture levels, leaving the skin soft and supple. Also beneficial to restore balance and harmony to your skin after an illness or a prolonged holiday in the sun.

Salvia – balances oily, combination skin

The Martina Gebhardt Salvia Skin Care products help to nurture, tone and restore balance to oily, large-pored and combination skin by working to regulate the activity of sebaceous, oil-producing glands and restoring harmony to the skin’s natural protective skin layer. The Salvia Mini Kit is perfectly sized for travelling, and makes a wonderful gift.

Happy Mother’s Day xx

 

 

New! Softest safest organic cotton treasures for your little one have arrived!

New to Ulula – organic cotton Swaddles, Bibs and Baby Buddies made with only the softest, safest organic cotton…

fresk-swaddle-set-2-pc-120x120-cm-whale-blue-fog-no-box These wonderful swaddles are made from soft, breathable organic cotton muslin with beautiful designs, and are generously sized at 120 x 120cm to make them truly multi-functional. These swaddles are so useful and handy in and around the home, nursery and nappy/changing bag.

fresk-swaddle-set-2-pc-120x120-cm-elefant-pink-no-boxSwaddling your baby in the first instance is so important to support them with the moro (startle) reflex which can be both surprising and distressing to such a tiny one. Joan Salter in The Incarnating Child recommends leaving their arms free to point upwards, so that their hands are near to their mouth. This is a more natural position for a newborn, than to have their arms down by their sides. Place them diagonally across the swaddle, then fold each side in turn, finally folding in the bottom of the swaddle around the baby in an extra layer of comfort.

fresk-swaddle-set-2-pc-120x120-cm-fox-blue-no-boxMuslins truly are a mother’s best friend. I had an airing cupboard shelf full of muslins, as I found that I was using several in just one day when my daughter was tiny!

They have so many uses, here are just a few:

  • great burping cloth
  • discreet breastfeeding
  • snuggle blanket
  • dribble catcher under baby’s chin when feeding
  • sunshade in car seat or pushchair
  • protection against wind in the pushchair or pram
  • impromptu bib as your little one gets older
  • lining the cot so you don’t have to change the whole bedding after your baby is sick

Made to the highest quality from pre-washed, 100% fine organic cotton, the swaddles are kind and gentle to delicate skin.

The smaller swaddles are 70 x 60cm and come in an attractive gift box. You may find these a better size for the changing bag.

fresk-bib-burpset-whale-blue-fog fresk-bib-burpset-fox-blue fresk-bib-burpset-elefant-pink

All the swaddles co-ordinate with the wonderfully soft and absorbent organic cotton bib and burp sets which make a perfect gift for your friends and family, and yourself!

The set comes in beautiful gift packaging and contains a bib and burp cloth to ensure that messes are kept to a minimum. When feeding, the bib is simply secured with snaps at the back and the burp cloth sits over your shoulder during winding and cuddles to protect your clothes from any little mishaps.

fresk-bib-burpset-fox-blue-no-box fresk-bib-burpset-elefant-pink-no-box fresk-bib-burpset-whale-blue-fog-no-box

Organic Toys? Certainly! These sweet organic baby buddy dolls are handmade in Egypt from natural organic cotton and filled with organic cotton off cuts from Under the Nile’s organic baby clothing range.

byutn1501_baby_comforter_pink_stars_1200x1000 byutn1502_baby_comforter_blue_stars_1200x1000 pale%20blue%20buddy pink%20buddy

Certified organic fabric makes it a safe comforter and teething toy, and the natural fibres make it nourishing to a baby’s senses.

Suitable from birth, with embroidered features and no small parts, this little friend makes a perfect present for a new-born or little one.

Or, if you prefer an adorable and cute elephant comforter there is just the one for you! Made from 100% organic Egyptian cotton inside and out and safe for little mouths.

organicelephantpink organicelephantblue

 

 

 

 

Perhaps your little one needs this cute cat comforter, or this bear buddy… choices, choices!

byutn267_organic_flat_bear_blue_1200x1000 byutn6801_organic_flat_cat_pink_1200x1000

 

 

 

 

 

What is so special about these baby buddies, is that they really do become best buddies – friends for life who share in the sleepy mumblings at nap time, and the chatty discussions about the dreams they just had in the morning… perfect!

 

When your little one is suffering with constipation

Constipation is bad enough when you are a grown up, but for little ones it can be miserable.

Constipation can occur for all sort of reasons; sometimes it is because of diet, some children have a sensitivity to foods and their bodies reaction is to experience a stool firming effect – constipation and for some little ones it is not what they eat but for example too little fluid intake. However it is common and in most cases, easily resolved.

How Holle can Help – when you are what you ‘Holle eat’!

Certain foods can have a stool firming effect, whilst others can have a stool loosening effect. If your little one becomes constipated avoid feeding constipating foods for a while or feed them only in small quantities.

Rice Porridge can have a firm stooling effect, in which case, you can happily swap to Holle Millet Porridge (gluten-free) or Rolled Oats Porridge which are both stool regulating.holle-organic-millet-porridge-with-rice

Carrots, bananas and raw apples can sometimes cause constipation in babies and complicate their digestion. Good alternatives are parsnips, pumpkins and cooked apple and pear.holle-pure-organic-pear-baby-food

As in all aspects of parenting, there is always an element of trusting your instincts – and those of your baby. If your little one refuses to eat a certain porridge, or fruit, or vegetable, they might well be instinctively self-selecting – telling you what they don’t need, and that may well help you find what they do need in order get themselves comfortable once again.

The beauty of Holle is that the company and their nutritionists, understand this completely – both scientifically and instinctively – and have produced a good selection of Demeter quality foods to support your little one’s needs. For a helpful and handy list of all the Holle Jars and their guide to introducing solid food take a look at the Holle Nutrition Guide.holle-demeter-baby-jar-nutrition-guide

How can I tell if my little one is constipated?
If your little one is straining to do a poo, it doesn’t necessarily mean that they are constipated. When it comes to a baby’s bowel movements, there is often no normal number or schedule. Similar to adults, babies’ bowel movement patterns vary. Poo can also change in texture from day to day.

If you’re concerned that your baby may be constipated, look out for these signs:

• Crying and discomfort, irritability or pain before doing a poo
• Dry, hard, pellet-like poo that she has trouble passing
• Fewer than three bowel movements a week
• Foul-smelling wind and poo
• Loss of appetite
• A hard belly
• As odd as it sounds, very liquid poo can be also be sign of constipation. Liquid poo can slip past the blockage of hard poo in the lower intestine. If you see this, don’t assume it’s diarrhoea. It may be evidence of constipation.

What causes constipation?
There are several possible reasons why your baby may be constipated:

• Formula milk. A formula-fed baby is more prone to constipation because formula can be harder to digest than breastmilk, causing poo to be firm and bulky. A breastfed baby is unlikely to get constipated. Breastmilk produces poo that is almost always soft, even if a baby hasn’t done a poo for a few days.
• Introducing solids. Babies often become constipated when they start solids, as their bodies learn how to manage new foods. Low-fibre foods and not enough fluids also contribute to constipation.
• Dehydration. Your baby may be refusing milk because she’s teething, or is poorly with a cold; Your older baby may not be drinking enough milk or water with her solid foods. Whatever the reason – if your baby isn’t getting enough fluids, she may become dehydrated. This can cause dry, hard poo that is difficult to pass.
• A medical condition or illness. Occasionally, constipation can be a symptom of a food allergy, food poisoning, or a problem with the way the body absorbs food, known as a metabolic disorder.
• Worry – maybe about a big change such as moving house, starting nursery or the arrival of a new baby.
For more information and advice click here NHS

Babies who haven’t been weaned
If your baby is constipated but hasn’t started to eat solid foods, the first way to treat them is to give them extra hydration between their normal feeds. The Holle Nutritionists recommend for little ones’ the Baby Tea which contains the herbs fennel, aniseed, caraway and camomile, which together act effectively to relieve wind and support and encourage healthy digestion.holle-organic-baby-tea

The Tea can be taken either on its own, or if your little one is still drinking Milk, the Tea can be mixed in with your Holle Infant Formula by using 1/3 Holle Tea and 2/3 water. Do not use more water than recommended on the packet when you make up the bottle.

“Absolutely love this milk started my baby on it at one week old for a top up with my breast milk as I found it too hard to express breast milk! My baby girl took to it instantly and has had no negative side effects, although I found she was constipated (this is normal for breastfeed baby’s as they absorb all milk) although I did email ulula to ask if they had experienced anyone else having constipation, there customer services was incredible and suggested making the formula with 30ml of their kinda tea and they sent me some samples to try! Instantly this relived my baby’s colic and constipation! She LOVES the milk so much that TBH would chose the formula over the breast lol but she is happy with both! I would highly recommend both these products!” Vicki

“Hi, We we’re giving breast milk & bottle but now only give bottle milk & our 4month old was getting constipation. I read somewhere to give him a tsp. of juice which worked but I didn’t want to be giving him so much sugar all the time, I read a review on this website from the goats milk that said they use this tea. I ween him off the juice now & his poo it great. I use little tea pot & get three bottle from one tea bag. It works fine & saves me some money. Thanks Holle x” Charlotte

Constipation in children
Constipation is common in childhood, particularly when children are being potty trained. As well as infrequent or irregular bowel movements, a child with constipation may also have any of the following symptoms:

• loss of appetite
• a lack of energy
• being irritable, angry or unhappy
• foul-smelling wind and stools
• stomach pain and discomfort
• soiling their pants
• generally feeling unwell

If your child is constipated, they may find it painful to poo. This creates a vicious circle: the more it hurts, the more they hold back. The more constipated they get, the more it hurts. Even if pooing isn’t painful, once your child is really constipated, they will stop wanting to go to the toilet altogether. The Weleda Nappy Change Cream is a must for sore bottoms.cal_nappychangecream75mltubeen

Ways to help prevent and relieve constipation in babies and children:

• Make sure your baby/child has plenty to drink – this includes breastfeeding and formula milk feeds.
• You may want to try gently moving your baby’s legs in a bicycling motion or carefully massaging their tummy to help stimulate their bowels.baby_body-oil
• Once weaned successfully, give your child a variety of foods, including plenty of fruit and vegetables which are a good source of fibre.
• Encourage your child to be physically active – it really helps.
• Get your child into a routine of regularly sitting on the potty or toilet, after meals or before bed, and praise them whether or not they poo each time. This is particularly important for boys, who may forget about pooing once they are weeing standing up.
• Make sure your child can rest their feet flat on the floor or a step when they’re using the potty or toilet, to get them in a good position for pooing.
• Ask them to tell you if they feel worried about using the potty or toilet – some children don’t want to poo in certain situations, such as at nursery.
• Stay calm and reassuring, so that your child doesn’t see going to the toilet or mealtimes as a stressful situation. You want your child to see pooing as a normal part of life, not something to be ashamed of, and food and eating as their friend, not something that ultimately hurts them.

If your little one’s constipation is not getting better don’t struggle on alone; do please consult your GP or Health Visitor for support.